6 results for author: russell@tradeviews.net


Where has the Chinese trade data gone?

Something very odd happened in June this year. The Chinese customs authority stopped publishing their detailed trade statistics, citing a ‘technical problem’. Commentators believe its one of the retaliatory measures against the US caused by the trade war initiated by Mr Trump. Obviously analysts will still want to know how trade is affected. This measure is to try and stop us… or will it? Chinese trade data has never been perfect. Like most authoritarian states they like to control what we see and they openly admit to manipulating data. This is either for competition reasons or to ‘prove’ a larger governmental aim. Therefore I always read ...

The Future of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Shipping

AI, as it’s usually called, can be defined as the ability of machines to mimic cognitive functions, such as learning and problem-solving, that humans associate with other human minds. Computers can detect problems and work round them. Except, of course, when they don’t; as happened in 2016 when a Tesla car being driven in Florida failed to detect a lorry crossing its path, crashing and killing its human driver. He was partly to blame; but so was Tesla. Many high profile people have commented on this technology; some inspired and some fearful. Stephen Hawking the famous Theoretical physicist who passed away earlier this year believes “The ...

The Sun Shines in the East, Invigorating Dry Cargo Demand – A Review of 2016 Trade Patterns

March is a good month to look back at customs trade data and see how the dry cargo market performed in the previous year. The largest trading countries have published their December monthly data. We now have a clear picture about what went on. Compared to the stagnation in 2015, we see a 3% rise in dry cargo demand across the globe. Tonne mile trade grew at the same rate of 3%, indicating no real change in overall voyage lengths. Asia is the place where most of the growth happened, accounting for 67% of global demand. Intra Asia trade grew by 5% while trade into Asia grew by 4%. Contrast this with Europe where intra and extra trade fell by 2% ...

Dry Cargo Subscription Service Launched

On the 4th April  2016 we launched our Dry Cargo trade data subscription service. This is a major step forward from our previous method of emailing reports. The new module offers essential tools that a trade analyst will need to get an unparalleled perspective of global trade. As the year progresses we'll add more features to give new insights into trade. This module includes over 90 different cargoes including ores & minerals, grains & agribulks, fertilisers, forestry, construction and steel. Next month we’ll be launching our beta wet cargo module to include crude oil and products cargoes. Initially we created these four pages to ...

Dry Cargo Conference – Rotterdam

The conference focused on the macro overview of the dry cargo segment along with detailed presentations on the technical side. The audience was very international and the meeting provided good networking opportunity. Russell Thompson from Tradeviews gave a presentation on grain, fertilisers and biomass. He spoke about the structural trade volumes for these markets and presented their study on seasonality. Many grains and fertilisers had a two peak seasonality which coincided with the two hemisphere harvest periods. For wheat the main peak was in the August northern hemisphere  and notably May for the soybean harvest from Brazil. For Biomass, ...

Our Presentation at IMSF

Tradeviews attended the IMSF (International Maritime Statistics Forum) in Gothenburg, Sweden in May where we enjoyed many thought provoking presentations. The topics on discussion were: Shipping markets, trade and commodity demand Shipping costs Ship building Upcoming opportunities and challenges Tradeviews gave a presentation on the latest trends in Dry Cargo Trade, focusing on the trends in 2014. We said we believed 2014 was an underperforming year with falling trade in iron ore and coal. The commodities that performed better were grain, fertilisers and construction based materials. However, the slowdown of the coal trade meant ...